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Sheesh Mahal

Sheesh Mahal

The Hall of Mirrors: Mehrangarh's Sheesh Mahal, was Maharaja Ajit Singh’s bed chamber, decorated with mirror work.

Under the arches are painted gesso panels of sacred subjects: Brahma, Shiva with Parvati, Devi, Krishna and Ganesh all sit enthroned; while in other panels Krishna plays the flute and lifts mount Goverdhan; and Rama and Sita confer with Hanuman. The blue, green, silver and gold Christmas tree balls suspended on the ceiling and the European glass chandelier are late additions.

Phul Mahal

Phul Mahal

The Palace of Flowers: A grand and highly ornamented reception room, the Phul Mahal was constructed by Abhay Singh, son of Ajit Singh, in the mid – 18th century. This elevated room is less accessible, and would not have been used for receiving outside visitors but for more restricted male assemblies. It was probably intended as a private audience hall, where the ruler could confer with his thakurs and ministers, and perform certain personal rituals, such as the celebration of birthdays. Being open to the breeze, the room could also have served for some leisure pursuits such as listening to music. The architectural style of the interior – with its balustered and fluted columns – is derived from the palaces of Shah Jehan; though the outer casing, with elaborate jaali work, is typical of this part of Rajasthan. The paintings of the columns and walls are original, but the ceiling and its cornice were repainted in the mid 19th century, in the reign of Takhat Singh: his portrait and those of his sons feature in the scheme.

Takhat Vilas

Takhat Vilas

This beautiful room was the personal apartment of Takhat Singh (1843-72). This is one of the most remarkable interiors in Rajasthan. It is an unusually large space: there is no need for supporting columns in the centre as the ceiling is carried on great wooden beams that are in turn supported by engaged piers and corbels on the side walls. All the surfaces including the floor are painted. Even the windows are filled with coloured glass panes, creating an eerie light. The subjects of the wall paintings here are varied: they include some sacred themes; some scenes of hunting and courtly dancing; and some local folk tales.

Moti Mahal

Moti Mahal 

The Palace of Pearls: It takes its name from the quality of the lime plaster used. Mixed with finely crushed shells, it gives the surfaces of the room a pearl-like luster. Oil lamps glowed from every alcove. Light bounced off the gold filigree ceiling and reflected the colors of the stained glass windows. This created a marble-like patina on the walls.

The five deep alcoves running above the doors on the right look like a decorative architectural feature, but they’re actually secret balconies. And here the Maharaja’s queens would sometimes sit, silently listening in on court proceedings. This extension of the Maharaja’s ears was often invaluable.

 

 

World Sufi Festival

Rajasthan International Folk Festival

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Quotes

"A Palace that might have been built by Titans and colored by the morning sun" - Rudyard Kipling